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Biodiversity in Remote Areas

sonoran_desert_matt.jpg
http://www.ottosenphotography.com/sonoran_desert_matt.jpg








Introduction

Our mission statement is simple: focus on studying areas with little human population and to discover the benefits of the unknown biodiversity in those remote areas. This mission statement is fueled by a series of questions:
1. What kinds of remote areas house undiscovered species?
2. Why are the remote areas necessary for the development of species?
3. What kinds of species live in these areas?
4. How do these species survive with fewer resources? Or do they have their own resources?
5. How do other species benefit from the biodiversity in these areas?

These questions are answered specific to each of the regions of study listed below:
Oceanic
Desert
Mountainous


Zombie-kid Jonathan knows a lot about biodiversity!



Ocean (Anna Bokman)

What kinds of remote areas house undiscovered species?
Regions which house more biodiversity include oceanic floors, mid-ocean ridges, and abyssal plains. These regions are located throughout the planet's oceans.

Areas of the ocean that are closer to the surface and thus studied by people are less diverse in general with respects to animal and plant species.




What kinds of conditions do the remote depths of the ocean contain?
Less oxygen
Significantly less light exposure

Why are remote areas necessary for the development of species?
Remote areas carry the benefit of having a very specific environment and climate for species to evolve and develop in. Coral reefs and kelp forests are all in the same general climates and environments, not to mention they also interact with humans. Therefore, species that exist at these locations closer to the surface develop close similarities to most other species. For example, most fish generally have the same shape and anatomy, with the exception of large predator fish and aquatic life forms. As you go deeper into the ocean, species become more vaired and have more specialized qualities that allow them to adapt to the environment. These qualities include a general trent of being larger than species closer to the surface, large teeth, and a light source to act as bait for their prey.

What kinds of species live in these areas?
We cannot know what kinds of species live in these areas without visiting them ourselves, but we do know that they must be very specialized species because thy have to accustom themselves to specific living conditions. Little light, little oxygen, etc.

How do these species survive with fewer resources? Or do they have their own resources?
These undiscovered species must be able to survive with their own resurces and the few that they are provided with in their areas. Since these remote areas do not come with many resources for species to use, the ones that do manage to live and survive there must require less to do so.

How do other species benefit from the biodiversity in these areas?
If a more specialized species were to die off in their remote environment, that entire stem of biodiversity would be wiped out. If an entire species gets killed off, biodiversity as a whole is degraded. Therefore, other secies can benefit from these remote areas because when they do manage to house species that can survive there, biodiversity as a whole is still strong.





Desert (Karen Knight)

"Allopathy": The detrimental influence of one plant upon another. COMPETITION.
--There are shrubs in the desert that take in so many resources that the areas around them are bare; other plants cannot get any resources for themselves.

What kinds of remote areas house undiscovered species?

What kinds of conditions does the desert contain?

Why are remote areas necessary for the development of species?

What kinds of species live in these areas?


How do these species survive with fewer resources? Or do they have their own resources?

How do other species benefit from the biodiversity in these areas?




Mountain (Andrew Riley)

What kinds of remote areas house undiscovered species?
Mountains contain many different areas in which undiscovered large and small species can live. These areas include subterranean caves, tunnel systems, and lakes, dorment volcano craters, high mountain passes (all climates: arid, cold, temperate), and forests which humans have had little success studying scientifically. These ares can house undiscovered species because they are hostile to human life and contain conditions which are hostile to species which live in more temperate environments. The majority of undiscovered species are most likely insects, as bacteria do not develop in cold environments and environments in which there is high altitude. Insects have the capability to live in most every environment because of their durability to even the worst conditions above and below ground.

ht_batboy06_070724_ssv.jpg
Subterranean species sighed in NYC subway!!!
http://a.abcnews.com/images/US/ht_batboy06_070724_ssv.jpg

What kinds of conditions do high-altitude mountains contain?
The conditions that high-altitude mountains contain really depends on the mountain's location. Conditions can range from the frigid cold to covered in forests, to a mixture of both, to arid and dry. Conditions at high altitudes are hostile to life primarily to its lack of oxygen. Every living creature on the planet needs oxygen and at very high altitudes, the air has a significantly less amount of oxygen than at lower altitudes.

Why are remote areas necessary for the development of species?

As said before, the species which live at very high altitudes are very specialized to do so. They have the capability of surviving with less oxygen than their sea-level counterparts and also have the ability to survive in extreme heat or cold. Subterranean species also have to adapt to the dark and lack of oxygen from living in an enclosed space, not only living at a very high altitude.

What kinds of species live in these areas?
High Altitude: Larger lung capacity, not many medium or small mammals, more microscopic species below ice (if at cold climate)
Medium Altitude: Medium-sized predators, rugged vegitation, birds
Low Altitude: Most likely covered in forest if in temperate climate, tundra in cold climate, desert in hot climate with species native to those climates

mountain1.jpg
Example of high, medium, and low altitude environments with the surrounding forest (temperate environment)
http://www.destination360.com/north-america/us/wyoming/images/s/wyoming-rocky-mountains.jpg

mountain2.jpg
(Distaint mountain) Example of high, medium, and low altitude environments (desert environment)

http://media-cdn.tripadvisor.com/media/photo-s/00/1b/07/c5/atlas-mountains.jpg

How do these species survive with fewer resources? Or do they have their own resources?
They survive using the specific characteristics they developed to cope with the hostile environment and use a "survival of the fittest" approach. High altitudes have little food, so the mammals that inhabit them compete to survive. They may travel to lower altitudes which contain larger amounts of nourishment (like plants, other animals) in order to survive. Smaller insects live in the ground and eat what insects and other stuff like that usually eat with little regard to what's going on above them.

How do other species benefit from the biodiversity in these areas?
Mountains act as barriers for invasive species, supply the world of its water, and house biodiversity which benefits the species which live at increasingly lower altitudes. The species which live at these lower altitudes cannot survive without the benefits of mountains and the species which inhabit them, thus the biodiversity which exists in mountains is the building block of live for the rest of the planet.